Museum Events

Natural History, December/January 2004 | Go to article overview

Museum Events


AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

EXHIBITIONS

Totems to Turquoise: Native North American Jewelry Arts of the Northwest and Southwest

Through July 10, 2005

This groundbreaking exhibition celebrates the beauty, power, and symbolism of the magnificent tradition of Native American arts, examining techniques, materials, and styles that have evolved over the past century as Native American jewelers have transformed their traditional craft into vital forms of cultural and artistic expression.

The Butterfly Conservatory. Tropical Butterflies Alive in Winter

Through May 30, 2005

A return engagement of this popular exhibition includes more than 500 live, free-flying tropical butterflies in an enclosed habitat that approximates their natural environment.

Frogs: A Chorus of Colors

Through January 9,2005

This delightful exhibition introduces visitors to the colorful and diverse world of frogs, with over 200 specimens thriving in re-created habitats.

Frogs: A Chorus of Colors is presented with appreciation to Clyde Peeling's Reptiland.

Art in Nature: The Photographs of John Daido Loori

Through January 9,2005

Striking abstract photographs reveal the natural beauty of the land- and seascape of Point Lobos State Reserve in California.

Vital Variety A Visual Celebration of Invertebrate Biodiversity

Through Spring 2005

Invertebrates, which play a critical role in the survival of humankind, are the subject of these extraordinarily beautiful close-up photographs.

This exhibition is made possible by the generosity of the Arthur Ross Foundation.

Fall Colors across North America

Through March 13, 2005

The fiery colors of autumn come to life in these images by Anthony E. Cook, taken as he journeyed from deep southern bayous to northern tundras.

GLOBAL WEEKENDS

Kwanzaa 2004: We Are Family!

Sunday, 12/26

12:00 noon-6:00 p.m.

Celebrate Kwanzaa with an afternoon of family activities and performances.

Living in America: Native Americans of the Northeast

Three Saturdays, 1/15-1/29 1:00-5:00 p.m.

Examine the enduring legacy of Native America in New York and the Northeast. see preceding page for more information.

Global Weekends are made possible, in part, by the Coca Cola Company. The American Museum of Natural History wishes to thank the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc., theTolan Family, and the family of Frederick H. Leonhardt for their support of these programs.

LECTURES

Hearing with the Eye

Tuesday, 12/7, 6:30 p.m. (Meditation); 7:00 p.m. (Lecture)

With John Daido Loori, photographer and abbot of Zen Mountain Monastery.

Adventures in the Global Kitchen: Fiery Foods

Tuesday, 12/14, 7:00 p.m.

With Lois Ellen Frank, Kiowa, and Walter Whitewater, Dine.

Welcome to the Genome

Thursday, 12/16, 7:00 p.m.

With Rob DeSalle, AMNH, and Michael Yudell, Drexel University.

On the Wing: To the Edge of the Earth with the Peregrine Falcon

Thursday, 1/13, 7:00 p.m.

With naturalist and author Alan Tennant.

Big Bang

Tuesday, 1/18, 7:00-8:30 p.m.

With science writer Simon Singh.

Uncorking Ancient Vintages

Thursday, 1/27, 7:00 p.m.

With culinary expert and chef Bill Yosses.

FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS

Haida Blanket Workshop

Saturday, 32/4,12:00 a.m.-12:00 noon (Ages 4-6, each child with one adult) or 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Ages 7-9)

Navajo Weaving Workshop

Sunday, 12/5,11:00 a.m.-12:00 noon (Ages 4-6, each child with one adult) or 1:00-2:00 p. …

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