Last Landscapes: The Architecture of the Cemetery in the West

By Watkins, Keith | Anglican Theological Review, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Last Landscapes: The Architecture of the Cemetery in the West


Watkins, Keith, Anglican Theological Review


Last Landscapes: The Architecture of the Cemetery in the West. By Ken Worpole and Larraine Worpole (photographer). London: Reaktion Books, 2003. 223 pages. $35.00 (paper).

In addition to being a remarkably beautiful book, Last Landscapes is a persuasive exposition of the "claim [that] the cemetery remains a moral force-field in society, acting as a meeting-place of past and future aspirations, as well as a reminder of the transience of human wishes and actions" (p. 160). The Worpoles have visited many cemeteries throughout the United Kingdom, Europe, and the United States, and Ken Worpole has read exhaustively in literature dealing with cultural attitudes towards death and the final disposition of "the mortal part of man" (from an inscription over the gates to London's Abney Park Cemetery, established 1840, p. 134).

In Last Landscapes, as in four other books published since 1993, Worpole is interested in the relationship of public spaces and other aspects of urban policy. He organizes his descriptive reflections to show how historical developments and cultural variations intersect. An example is the chapter entitled "Cities of the Dead" (p. 79). Worpole begins by discussing D. H. Lawrence s book on Etruscan tombs, built in the seventh and sixth centuries B.C.E. Quoting Lawrence, he states that the arrangement of roads within the cemetery proves "that a normal town-planning scheme existed inside the necropolis" (p. 82). Worpole discusses the catacombs of Rome, especially as they became important to Christians across many centuries because of martyrs who were buried there. He describes rural churchyards which, despite "their version of universal citizenship . . . have not been entirely immune to geographies of status and power" (p. 84). He describes the modern necropolis as it developed in cemeteries like Père-Lachaise in Paris (opened in 1804) and San Cataldo in Moderna, Italy (opened in 1984). Because these cities of the dead mirror cultural patterns of the societies that established them, they become places where those cultures can be experienced and understood. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Last Landscapes: The Architecture of the Cemetery in the West
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.