Interparental Agreement, Parent-Child Responsiveness, and Children's Peer Competence

By Lindsey, Eric W.; Mize, Jacquelyn | Family Relations, October 2001 | Go to article overview

Interparental Agreement, Parent-Child Responsiveness, and Children's Peer Competence


Lindsey, Eric W., Mize, Jacquelyn, Family Relations


Interparental Agreement, Parent-Child Responsiveness, and Children's Peer Competence*

This study examined associations between interparental agreement, parent-child responsiveness, and children's social competence with peers. Assessments of interparental agreement among 33 parenting dyads were based on (a) parental agreement on beliefs about the use of control in childrearing, and (b) parental similarity in the use of initiations during play with child. Parent-child responsiveness was assessed by subjective ratings of parent-child play interaction. Teachers and peers provided assessments of children's social competence. Associations were found between parental agreement in beliefs about control and parental similarity in the use of control with child. Parental agreement on beliefs about the use of control and parental similarity in the use of control were both positively associated with children's social competence. Parent-child responsiveness also was positively associated with children's social competence. Associations between agreement measures and children's social competence were partially mediated by parent-child responsiveness. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

The quality of children's peer relationships has been identified as an important hallmark of children's current and later social adjustment (e.g., Parker & Asher, 1987). Evidence points to a variety of positive developmental outcomes that are associated with peer acceptance (Ladd, 1990), whereas negative outcomes are linked to rejection by peers (DeRosier, Kupersmidt, & Patterson, 1994). Such patterns of association have been found as early as the toddler and the preschool years (Ladd & Price, 1987). Recognition of the importance of peer relationships to children's social functioning has led researchers to question the origins of children's social status among peers. Given the fact that children's earliest social interaction occurs within the family, researchers have turned their attention to examining possible links between patterns of interaction within children's family of origin and children's peer relationships. Although the influence of siblings on children's behavior cannot be denied (Dunn, Slomkowski, & Beardsall, 1994), parent-child interaction has been identified as a major contributor to children's social behavior with peers (Hart, DeWolf, Wozniak, & Burts, 1992; Putallaz, 1987).

The extensive body of literature highlighting linkages between children's relationships with parents and their relationships with peers points to the importance of family interactions for children's relationships outside the family. What is missing from this body of research, however, is a family systems perspective. According to family systems theory, family functioning is constructed through the patterns of behavior displayed between members of particular family subsystems and through interactions between family subsystems, so the family as a whole is greater than the sum of its constituent subsystems (von Bertalanffy, 1968; Minuchin, 1985). Thus, to understand linkages between the family and children's relationships with peers, it is important to consider the interdependent nature of individual family members who form subsystems within the family. To date, however, the majority of studies examining links between the family and children's peer relationships have focused on the contribution of individual parenting behavior or on the separate contributions of both mother and father. Less attention has been given to how maternal and paternal childrearing practices combine to influence children's social competence (Gable, Crnic, & Belsky, 1994; Russell & Russell, 1994). The present study represents an effort to extend the literature on linkages between the family and children's peer relationships by examining possible associations between processes of interparental agreement and children's social competence.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Interparental Agreement, Parent-Child Responsiveness, and Children's Peer Competence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.