National FOI Support Groups

The Quill, September 2001 | Go to article overview

National FOI Support Groups


This list includes groups that advocate on behalf of freedom of information, lobby or provide educational information.

Access Reports, Inc. 1624 Dogwood Lane Lynchburg, VA 24503

Harry A. Hammitt, editor/publisher

Phone: (804) 384-5334

E-mail: hhammitt@accessreports.com

Web: www.accessreports.com

Publishes a biweekly newsletter that reports on court cases and government information policy relating to FOI issues.

American Civil Liberties Union 125 Broad St. New York, NY 10004

Ira Glasser, executive director

Phone: (212) 549-2500

Web: www.adu.org

Promotes the use and understanding of laws. The mission of the ACLU is to assure that the Bill of Rights is preserved for each new generation.

American Library Association 50 E. Huron St. Chicago, IL 60611

William Gordon, executive director

Phone: (800) 545-2433

Web: www.ala.org

ALA works with federal agencies to initiate legislation that will extend library services; the association founded the Coalition on Government Information; and publishes Information: The Currency of Democracy.

American Society of Access Professionals

1444 1 St. NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20005

Claire Shanley, executive director

Phone: (202) 712-9054

Web: www.accesspro.org

Helps federal employees, attorneys, journalists, educators, contractors and others working with such access statutes as the FOIA and the Privacy Act; its goal is to enhance understanding of and responsible and cost-effective administration of access laws.

American Society of Newspaper Editors 11690B Sunrise Valley Drive Reston, VA 20191-1409

Scott Bosley, executive director

Phone: (703) 453-1122

Fax: (703) 453-1133

E-mail: asne*asne.org

Web: www.asne.org

FOI committee works to strengthen FOI laws, takes an aggressive stance on breaking FOI issues.

Associated Press Managing Editors Association

50 Rockefeller Plaza New York, NY 10020

Mark Mittelstadt, Associated Press liaison Chris Peck, president

Phone: (212) 621-1838

E-mail: apme@ap.org

Web: www.apme.com

APME supports freedom of information through a special committee and presents annu al awards to AP member newspapers and individuals.

Brechner Center for Freedom of Information

University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications P.O. Box 118400 Gainesville, FL 32611 Prof. Sandra Chance, director

Phone: (352) 392-2273

Web: www.jou.ufl.edu/brechner

Conducts research and educates the public in mass media law and the First Amendment, maintains the Citizens Access Project which provides links to FOI resources in every state.

Center for Investigative Reporting

500 Howard St., Suite 206 San Francisco, CA 94105

Burt Glass, executive director

Phone: (415) 543-1200

Fax: (415) 543-8311

E-mail: center@circonline.org

Web: www.muckraker.org

Promotes investigative reporting and includes freedom of information issues as one of its main areas of study.

Electronic Frontier Foundation 454 Shotwell St.

San Francisco, CA 94110 Shari Steele, executive director

Phone: (415) 436-9333

Fax: (415) 436-9993

E-mail: info@eff.org

Web: www.eff.org

A civil liberties group that works in the public interest to protect freedom of information, privacy and free expression online.

First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University 1207 18th Ave. S. Nashville, TN 37212

Kenneth A. Paulson, executive director

Phone: (615) 321-9588

Fax: (615) 321-9599

E-mail: info@fac.org

Web: www.freedomforum.org/first

The center is a forum for dialogue and debate on free expression, including freedom of information issues. …

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