Psychological Approaches to Pain Management: A Practitioner's Handbook (2Nd Ed.)

By D'Ortona, Matthew J. | Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Psychological Approaches to Pain Management: A Practitioner's Handbook (2Nd Ed.)


D'Ortona, Matthew J., Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy


Psychological Approaches to Pain Management: A Practitioner's Handbook (2nd ed.) D. C. Turk and R. J. Gatchel (Eds.). New York: Guilford (www.guilford.com). 2002, 590 pp., $70.00 (hardcover).

In this updated and much expanded second edition of arguably, one of the classic texts regarding the psychological treatment of chronic pain and associated disorders, Drs. Turk and Gatchel have gathered a collection of chapters that transverse the landscape of theory, research, and treatment of pain. As the book's title indicates, this is a book for clinicians who encounter patients with pain disorders in their everyday practices. The book is divided into three sections, which provide up-to-date theoretical models of pain, intervention strategies, and application of such treatment approaches to specific populations of patients and/or specific problems. case material is used frequently throughout the book to illustrate the interface between theory, technique and clinical application. Within each chapter, the relevant research literature frequently is cited and discussed. Of particular interest is a chapter devoted to individual treatment outcome and an overview of the outcome literature regarding the psychological treatment of pain. In the treatment section, the major schools of psychological thought, and modes of treatment, are presented with distinct clarity and practical application. Cognitive and behavioral treatments for pain disorders are given particular emphasis.

Each chapter not only provides an overview of the respective treatment modality or intervention model, but also takes each treatment approach and illustrates how it can be implemented in everyday practice, which will be of considerable relevance to the treating clinician or advanced graduate student. Technique, as well as nonspecific factors related to favorable treatment outcome, and clinical conceptualization, are given appropriate balance. Integration of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment is included as well. The psychopharmacology chapter also has multiple tables that can serve as a "quick reference" to the variety of medications that are commonly used in pain treatment. Such information including each medication's trade name, generic equivalent, common dosage, and side effects are included.

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