Health Care


WHETHER YOU'RE AN UNINSURED DANCER WORKING IN NYC OR A VISITING OUT-OF-TOWNER, THESE RESOURCES WILL HELP KEEP YOU IN GOOD HEALTH.

THE ACTORS' FUND OF AMERICA provides health care resources, including seminars on getting, keeping and using health care, dealing with medical debt and care for the uninsured. It also has mental health, substance abuse and women's health programs, plus emergency financial assistance. Staff is available to assist with personal concerns of any kind, from finding affordable housing to career transition to financial problems.

212-221-7300

actorsfund.org

MIDTOWN/TIMES SQ

729 7th Av, between 48th and 49th sts, 10th Fl

Subway: 1, 9 to 50th St; N, E, W, to 49th St; C, E to 50th St

See: Organizations

AL HIRSCHFELD FREE HEALTH CLINIC provides free health care for uninsured and underinsured NYC artists and is sponsored by the Actors' Fund of America and Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS Services include primary and specialty care, health screenings, patient education and gynecological exams. Though mammograms are not performed in-house, staff will assist patients in arranging a free test elsewhere. Bring proof of work in the entertainment industry, which includes proof of membership in any performer's union, pay stubs or 1040 forms showing you've made at least $3,000 in the performing industry during any 2 of the last 5 years. The clinic also offers urgent care and referrals for out-of-town dancers with and without insurance.

212-489-1939

MIDTOWN WEST/ HELL'S KITCHEN

475 W 57th St, at 10th Av, 4th Fl

Subway: A, B, C, D, 1, 9 to 59th St-Columbus Circle

COMMUNITY HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK STATE supervises more than 20 nonprofit community health centers in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens that will serve anyone, regardless of insurance situation. Sliding scale payment is offered for basic health care, including mental health and dental services.

212-279-9686

chcanys.org

THE EMERGENCY FUND FOR STUDENT DANCERS provides emergency financial assistance to students enrolled in full-time programs at 1 of the following member schools: The Alley School, Dance Theatre of Harlem School, The Limon Institute, Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance and Merce Cunningham Studio. …

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