Medical Faculty's Use of Print and Electronic Journals: Changes over Time and in Comparison with Scientists

By Tenopir, Carol; King, Donald W. et al. | Journal of the Medical Library Association, April 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Medical Faculty's Use of Print and Electronic Journals: Changes over Time and in Comparison with Scientists


Tenopir, Carol, King, Donald W., Bush, Amy, Journal of the Medical Library Association


Objectives: The objectives are to determine how medical faculty members use scholarly journals, whether print or electronic journals are read more, whether there is a pattern among types of users, and what similarities and differences there are between the use of journals by medical faculty and faculty in other disciplines.

Methods: Medical faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) multi-campus system were surveyed, and their responses estimated using critical incident technique to characterize the different aspects of their use of print and electronic journals.

Results: Medical faculty read a great deal, especially compared to scientists. The most frequently reported principal purpose of reading is to support their primary research (30% of reading). The majority of reading comes from recently published articles, mostly from personal subscriptions. Medical faculty continue to rely on print journals (approximately 70% of readings) versus electronic journals. Age of faculty does not appear to influence the choice of print or electronic format. Medical faculty read more articles than others on average and need information digested and verified in a way to save them time. Convenience and currency are highly valued attributes.

Conclusions: It can be asserted that librarians and publishers must find ways to provide the attributes of convenience and currency and match the portability of personal subscriptions in an electronic journal format for medical faculty.

INTRODUCTION

The scholarly scientific, technical, and medical journal systems are undergoing tremendous change. With steady increases in the price of print subscriptions, the number of subscriptions has declined correspondingly. Studies show that there are now many alternatives to print journals, including electronic peer-reviewed versions of traditional journals from the same publishers, aggregated databases of separate articles, electronic print servers, institutional open archives, and author's personal Web pages [1-3]. E-print servers, such as arXiv.org, provide access to separate articles that may be preprints of articles that will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals by the author, postprints (copies of articles that are also published in journals), or papers that will never be submitted to traditional journals. The Open Archives Initiative* promotes common interoperability to allow institutions or individuals to develop e-print repositories. Electronic versions of traditional journals change the publication system the least, as they may merely provide more convenient access to subscription-based journals. ?-print servers or open archives have the potential to induce more profound changes in the publication system as they already change the publishing system from a journal title model to a separate articles model and may be accomplished independent of publishers. Tenopir and King [4], in previous studies, have discovered that medical faculty may be more resistant to change than faculty in other disciplines, because, traditionally, they use journals for much of their professional development and to stay current with progress and trends in their field.

Many studies over the last decade show that the adoption rate for electronic journals, the viability of alternatives to the traditional print or electronic peerreviewed journal system, and the pace of change vary considerably by field [5, 6]. Meadows reports that, in the print world, medical professionals have relied heavily on scholarly journals, placing importance on specific journal titles in their subdisciplines and reading more than people in most other disciplines [7]. It is therefore interesting and timely to see how much of an impact electronic alternatives have had on medical faculty and to compare their information seeking, their reading patterns, and their adoption rates to those of scientists.

The study reported here surveyed medical faculty members in the University of Tennessee system to discover how they use journals and alternatives to journals.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Medical Faculty's Use of Print and Electronic Journals: Changes over Time and in Comparison with Scientists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.