2005 DIRECTORY FOR CORRECTIONAL EDUCATORS: Federal Resource Personnel

Journal of Correctional Education, January 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

2005 DIRECTORY FOR CORRECTIONAL EDUCATORS: Federal Resource Personnel


U. S. Department of Education

Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools

Correctional Education

202 B Capitol Place

555 New Jersey Avenue NW

Washington, DC 20208-5570

John Linton, Program Specialist

John.linton@ed.gov

202/205-7942

Carlette Huntley, Program Specialist

Carlette.Huntley@ed.gov

202/219-1743

National Institute for Literacy (NIFL)

www.nifl.gov

1775 I Street NW

Suite 730

Washington, DC 20006

202/233-2025

Bridges to Practice Learning Disabilities

Curriculum

http://www.nifl.gov/nifl/ld/bridges/corrections/corfections.html

June J. Crawford, Learning Disabilities

Program Director

202-233-2064

jcrawford@nifl.gov

National Institute of Corrections (NIC)

www.nicic.org

Community Corrections Division

Prisons Division

Office of International Assistance

Office of Correctional Job Training and Placement

Administrative Offices

320 First St., N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20534

(800) 995-6423

(202)307-3106

Academy Division

Jails Division

1960 Industrial Circle

Longmont, Colorado 80501

(800) 995-6429

(303)682-0382

Information Center

1860 Industrial Circle, Suite A

Longmont, Colorado 80501

(800) 877-1461

(303) 682-0213

Email asknicic@nicic.org

National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)

www.ncjrs.org

P.O. Box 6000

Rockville, MD 20849-6000

800-851-3420

301-519-5500

301-519-5212 (fax)

TTY Service for the Hearing Impaired (toll free): 1-877-712-9279

(local): 301-947-8374

The National Institute for Correctional Education (NICE)

The National Institute for Correctional Education (NICE) has been established at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) to provide support and service to the community of correctional educators to enhance their ability to create positive and effective learning environments. NICE will accomplish this through the development and delivery of preparatory and in-service curricula for correctional educators; through the assessment of curricula for incarcerated learners; through the effective dissemination of curricular information, research findings and other material related to correctional education; through the provision of funded educational experiences for individuals preparing for or engaged in correctional education careers; and through the establishment of and support for a correctional education research and evaluation agenda that will provide a basis for more effective data-based decision making. …

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2005 DIRECTORY FOR CORRECTIONAL EDUCATORS: Federal Resource Personnel
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