South Carolina Historical Society Recently Processed Manuscripts

South Carolina Historical Magazine, January 2005 | Go to article overview

South Carolina Historical Society Recently Processed Manuscripts


The following manuscript collections are now available for research by society patrons. The society welcomes gifts of manuscript collections and publications relating to South Carolina. Such gifts can be designated charitable contributions and are eligible for income tax deductions.

Descriptions of all of the society's manuscripts can be viewed at http://www.schistory.org.

0308.00 Rutledge & Young

Records, 1704-1887.

Ca. 14 linear ft.

Benjamin H. Rutledge and Henry E. Young formed a law partnership in Charleston, S.C., in 1865. Records of the law firm of Rutledge & Young consist of case records (1841-1887), estate records (1818-1887), property records (1704-1887), correspondence (1842-1887), financial records (18391885), and miscellaneous items. The firm's practice concentrated on such matters as estate administration and settlement, real estate transactions and disputes, debt collection, and other civil cases and procedures. Many of the records reflect the financial difficulties of businesses and individuals during Reconstruction.

0308.01 Rutledge & Young

Case Records, 1841-1887.

Ca. 2.5 linear ft.

This collection, which forms part of the Rutledge & Young records (1704-1887), contains correspondence, legal documents, and other records pertaining to clients of the law firm of Rutledge & Young and cases handled by this partnership such as bankruptcies, estate settlements, property disputes, and other civil suits. Persons represented include Louis Dubos, a French teacher dismissed from his post at Charleston High School; George W. Atwood of Hilton Head; Dr. Benjamin Rhett (1826-1884) of Abbeville; Theodore Cordes and John L. Lachmund; Charles Parsons of New York, N.Y.; Edwin Parsons & Co. of New York; P. Gaillard Stoney; George A. Trenholm; Owen P. Fitzsimmons (or Fitzsimons) and George R. Sibley; E. Scott Miles of Peake & Miles; Isaac W. Griffin of Berkeley County; F. N. Parker; John Freer Blacklock; and Louisa Bart and Caspar L. Bart, a Charleston grocer. Also included is an 1860 marriage settlement between Frances Mary Thompson of Charleston and Robert C. Oliver of Edgefield District.

Cases include James J. Gregg v. Marcellus M. Seabrook et al. (1869-1877), a suit involving land on Seabrook Island; Daniel Hand v, the Savannah and Charleston Railroad (1874-1881); A. V. Dawson v. James Perry (1874-1877), a case about supplies for the construction of a tram road to the Ashley River; Freeman & McCown v. Harriet L. Sowers (1869-1872), concerning a receivership of the partnership assets in a saw and grist mill near Timmonsville; South Carolina v. Alexander Macbeth et al. (1879), a case concerning the dissolution of the Batesville Manufacturing Co. in Greenville County; the bankruptcy of John Waties & Co. (1875-1876); and Julian Fishburne v. Alva Gage & Co. (1876).

case records (1873-1875) concerning claims for pay by U.S. census takers consist of correspondence between Rutledge & Young and individuals in southern states, as well as a list of the names of the 1860 census takers for South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and West Virginia. Another case (1878) concerns a dam at Caw Caw Swamp (Charleston Co.) and a dispute over swamp or rice lands including the "Roper Tract" by Edward B. Fishburne, C. T. Mitchell, and John D. Altman. case records (1875-1877) for a dispute about a canal trunk built by John H. Devereux for Barnwell R. Burnet's rice plantation in Colleton County (probably Dalton or Woodburne Plantation) includes statements by the plaintiff and others. Records (1866-1871) of a suit on behalf of Joseph Frank, a (Jewish?) farmer or factor of Darlington District (and later Charleston, S.C.), concern claims for a refund of a cotton tax.

A suit (1882-1884) brought by St. Philip's Church (Charleston, S.C.) sought to restrain the Zion Presbyterian Church from selling its building on Glebe Street to the A. …

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South Carolina Historical Society Recently Processed Manuscripts
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