Popular Culture Studies across the Curriculum

By Fishwick, Marshall W. | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), September 2005 | Go to article overview

Popular Culture Studies across the Curriculum


Fishwick, Marshall W., Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Popular Culture Studies across the Curriculum Ray B. Browne, Editor. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Co., 2005.

Who, having published some seventy-five books, having helped found the Popular Culture Association, and having edited the Journal of Popular Culture, would edit a new provocative book in 2005? Only one name pops up: Ray B. Browne. And this is the book.

The theme emerged in many earlier Browne books but is carried forward here. No discipline is complete unto itself. In interdisciplinary studies, popular culture is a universal theme.

The eighteen essays, four by Browne, explore the way that popular culture studies and deepens study in specialized fields, including the humanities, social sciences, religion, philosophy, geography, women's studies, economics, and sports. They deal not only with colleges and universities, but also suggest how popular culture is or should be used in business college curricula and other specialized institutions.

Why? Because popular culture is the engine that drives culture toward more democracy. To comprehend the powers that control society today and have always controlled them, we must understand everyday cultures. No discipline is an island unto itself.

Browne's introduction and essays do indeed cut across the curriculum. He begins by exploring English literature departments as centers of the humanities. Having received his own PhD in English at UCLA in the 1940s, he explored the concept of what constitutes literature. It has undergone a radical change since then, fired by political and social energies.

One result was the founding of American studies programs that included not only literature, but also history and folklore, all important to Browne. He wanted to combine and integrate them. "From that platform," he writes, "I have kept reaching out throughout my career" (10). The bounds of fiction would have to include peoples and cultures hitherto largely ignored. Browne's urge to reach out continued. American studies continued to be largely by, for, and about the elite. New approaches must be fostered.

At the first annual meeting of the American Studies Association in 1969, Browne offered to sponsor the next annual meeting at his university in Bowling Green, Ohio, if the sponsors would agree to give him a time slot to establish a Popular Culture Association, which had been formed in 1967. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Popular Culture Studies across the Curriculum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.