Ireland's Famine

By Daly, Douglas C. | Natural History, January 1996 | Go to article overview

Ireland's Famine


Daly, Douglas C., Natural History


In the United States, as well as in Ireland, a variety of commemorative events will mark the 150th anniversary of the Great Irish Famine. Beginning in 1995 and continuing to the year 2000, organizations in cities around the country will be erecting memorials, conducting symposiums and lectures, and holding commemorative events. These events are often announced in local newspapers, Irish-American publications, and newsletters of Irish societies and associations.

Ireland itself has the ultimate memorial to those who died--the Famine Museum, opened in May 1994, in Strokestown, County Roscommon. Here in the stable yards of Strokestown Park, the multimedia museum offers a unique experience of this tragic period of Irish history.

From the main street of the town, one passes through a Georgian Gothic triple arch, then along a wooded drive toward an imposing mansion, built in the 1730s by the Mahon family. Strokestown Park is a strangely fitting site for the Famine Museum. Major Denis Mahon, the landlord of the "big house" in the 1840s, was responsible for the eviction and forced emigration of thousands of destitute, hungry tenants. He was assassinated by them in 1847. Conflicting accounts of his murder, delivered over a background of whispers, can be heard in one room of the museum. Other rooms are devoted to the potato, its introduction and blight; political history, highlighted by panels of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century newspaper cartoons and photographs; and hunger in the world today. Town documents and Mahon family papers exhibited throughout the museum illuminate the social and economic conditions that led to the famine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ireland's Famine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.