Milestones from Forty Years of NEH

Humanities, September/October 2005 | Go to article overview

Milestones from Forty Years of NEH


1965

Claibome Pell introduces a bill that creates the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities, President Johnson signs the bill on September 29, 1965.

1966

Barnaby C. Keeney becomes the first chaiman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

First two grants go to the American Society of Papyrologists and the American Council of Learned Societies.

1967

Work begins on the letters of Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis.

1968

First volume of The Collected Writings of Walt Whitman published.

University of Texas excavates part of Corinth.

1969

Dumas Malone completes first volume of Jefferson and His Time.

Work begins on The Papers of George Washington

1970

The thirteen-part series Civilisation airs.

Foxfire recounts Appalachian history and culture.

1971

Work begins on The Dictionary of American Regional English.

State humanities councils begin with test models in six states: Georgia, Maine, Missouri, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Wyoming.

1972

First Jefferson Lecture is delivered by Lionel Trilling, "Mind and the Modern World."

Digitizing of the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae begins.

1973

Summer Seminars for College Teachers program begins.

Impressionist and postimpressionist masterpieces from Soviet Union tour U.S.

1974

First volume of The Papers of John Marshall published.

1975

Jefferson and His Time by Dumas Malone wins Pulitzer.

"Archaeological Treasures from the People's Republic of China" opens.

Work begins on the papers of Jane Addams of Hull-House.

1976

"The Treasures of Tutankhamen" becomes first American blockbuster exhibition.

Adams Chronicles wins four Emmys.

1977

Edith Who/ton: A Biography by R.W.B. Lewis wins Pulitzer.

1978

Slavery and Human Progress by David Brion Davis wins Pulitzer, Bancroft, and National Book Award.

"Pompeii AD 79" exhibition opens.

1979

The Dred Scott Cose by Don E. Fehrenbacher wins Pulitzer.

The Frederick Douglass Papers published.

James McGregor Burns publishes Political Parties in America.

Work begins on revision of English Short-Title Catalog.

1980

"The Great Bronze Age of China" tours country.

1981

First volume of The Journals of Henry David Thoreau published.

1982

U.S. Newspaper Program starts microfilming 67.5 million pages.

Library of America debuts with first four volumes.

The Historical Atlas of Congressional Districts in the United States Congress, 1789-1983 published.

1983

First volume of Coptic Encyclopedia published.

First volume of Encyclopedia of Islam published.

Encyclopedia lronica published.

1984

State humanities councils of North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and South Dakota start modern Chautauqua movement.

"The Sun King: Louis XIV and the New World" debuts.

1985 "

The Stone Carvers wins Academy Award.

First volume of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin published.

1986

Bicentennial Bookshelf Program established.

Maya book Popul Vuh wins PEN Translation Prize for Poetry.

Work begins on four-volume edition of Dead Sea Scrolls.

Cathedral airs.

First two volumes of The Cambridge History of China published.

1987

First volume of The Collected Rafters of Albert Einstein published.

Voyagers to the West by Bernard Bailyn wins Pulitzer.

1988

"The Art of Paul Gauguin" opens.

Work begins on microfilming three million brittle books.

1989

"Goya and the Spirit of Enlightenment" opens.

First volume of The Papers of Thomas A. Edison published.

Final volume of The Papers of Daniel Webster published. …

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