Defining the Situation: The Continuing Importance of Mathematics Education for African American Students

By Stewart, Mac A. | Negro Educational Review, July 2005 | Go to article overview

Defining the Situation: The Continuing Importance of Mathematics Education for African American Students


Stewart, Mac A., Negro Educational Review


American science and engineering still provide significant leadership to the world in the development of new ideas and technologies, but many individuals and groups interested in American education have voiced concern about whether our nation will continue to provide such leadership in the future. Recent news of South Korean progress with stem cell research suggests that other nations and cultures are in a position to challenge American dominance-if, indeed, we are now dominant. Observers who are old enough will recall a similar foreign challenge in the form of the Soviet launching of Sputnik on October 4, 1957. According to NASA's official account;

That launch ushered in new political, military, technological, and scientific developments. While the Sputnik launch was a single event, it marked the start of the space age and the U.S.-U.S.S.R space race.... the public feared that the Soviets' ability to launch satellites also translated into the capability to launch ballistic missiles that could carry nuclear weapons from Europe to the U.S. Then the Soviets struck again; on November 3, Sputnik II was launched, carrying a much heavier payload, including a dog named Laika.

The Soviet Union, like the Berlin Wall, has become a closed chapter in world political history, and while the recent South Korean achievements are notable, few Americans fear ballistic consequences from them. But many citizens are justifiably concerned about the possible economic consequences of a lagging national scientific and technical output, which seems to be evident in many emerging news stories. At the forefront of those concerned are American educators, many of whom have long suggested that our students in high school and college need to improve generally in their mathematical and scientific knowledge.

I cite my fellow editor, Shelley Johnson Carey, who introduces a recent issue of Peer Review, a quarterly publication of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, with the following comments: "Now, more than ever, the challenges of today's world require greater facility with, and comfort in, the worlds of science, technology, and engineering. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Defining the Situation: The Continuing Importance of Mathematics Education for African American Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.