Study: U.S. Needs Older Workers

Aging Today, November/December 2005 | Go to article overview

Study: U.S. Needs Older Workers


Working in retirement, once considered an oxymoron, is the new reality, according to a recent report titled Managing the Mature Workforce, from The Conference Board, the business research nonprofit based in New York City that produces the Consumer Confidence Index and the Leading Economic Indicators. "As a result, the increasingly multiethnic workforce will also become more multigenerational," states a summary of the report.

The report shows that by 2010, the number of people ages 35 to 44 in the United States, those normally expected to move into senior management, will decline by 10%; the number of U.S. workers ages 45 to 54 will grow by 21 %-and the number of people ages 55 to 64 will expand by 52%.

Half of companies interviewed for the study feel that the departure of mature workers presents a potential "brain drain." The report notes that the representatives of the technology and pharmaceutical industries expressed worries about the development of new products and services and anticipate a drain in experienced engineers, key account sales representatives and senior managers.

Furthermore, about a third of participating companies have conducted workforce planning studies and identified potential knowledge areas where they could be vulnerable. Half of those interviewed have some form of mentoring program in place to share and transfer knowledge.

STAYING COMPETITIVE

"Organizations that fail to understand the complexities or recognize the opportunities associated with an aging workforce may risk their ability to stay competitive," emphasized Jeri Sedlar, coauthor of the report and a senior adviser to The Conference Board.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Study: U.S. Needs Older Workers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.