Race, Ethnicity, and Sexuality: Intimate Intersections, Forbidden Frontiers

By Morales-Diaz, Enrique | Ethnic Studies Review, January 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Race, Ethnicity, and Sexuality: Intimate Intersections, Forbidden Frontiers


Morales-Diaz, Enrique, Ethnic Studies Review


One of the most significant points about Joane Nagel's text is its broad approach to the idea that ethnicity is sexualized and that the boundaries that on the surface seem to separate the two concepts are actually extremely thin and transparent. Thus, according to Nagel, "Ethnicity and sexuality are strained, but not strange bedfellows" (14). She supports this statement throughout her text, providing specific examples to argue her case. Her approach to the subject at hand also coincides with her goals for the book, "to illustrate the power and ubiquity of sexuality as a feature of racial, ethnic, and national identities, boundaries, and tensions" (4). Another one of her goals is connected to the broad approach to the subject matter; that readers will be inspired to undertake more specific research based on cases that she presents.

Nagel's first two chapters focus on more theoretical approaches that explain how she comes to the conclusion that ethnicity and sexuality have been mutually connected throughout various historical events such as the conquest and colonization of North America, the slave trade and "racial mixing." One concept that she continuously refers to is "Ethnosexual frontiers" which she defines as "erotic locations and exotic destinations that are surveilled and supervised, patrolled and policed, regulated and restricted, but that are constantly penetrated by individuals forging sexual links with ethnic Others across ethnic boundaries" (14). The next two chapters in her book are primarily focused on the United States and this nation's own experiences with ethnosexual frontiers. Chapter three looks at the process of conquest and colonization with a particular focus on the interactions, relationships and "intimacies" between European settlers and the native populations that were already established in the New World. She states that one of the ways that explorers would justify their treatment (suppression, oppression, conversion) of the Native was to portray them in sexual terms, making multiple references to nudity and "supposed" sexual practices undertaken which established clear differences between the two groups at the moment of encounter. The accounts on the part of the colonizers had a lasting impact on readers, and as scholars such as Stuart Hall and Jan Neverdeen Pieterse state, the labels, stereotypes and attitudes shared by the colonizers were not new to those developed during encounters with the New World Natives. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Race, Ethnicity, and Sexuality: Intimate Intersections, Forbidden Frontiers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.