EDITORIAL: Lougheed Was Right about U.S. Thirst for Our Water-But Wrong on NAFTA

CCPA Monitor, December/January 2005 | Go to article overview

EDITORIAL: Lougheed Was Right about U.S. Thirst for Our Water-But Wrong on NAFTA


Former Alberta Premier Peter Lougheed is to be commended for his Nov. 11 op-ed in the Globe and Mail in which he warned of an impending aggressive U.S. push for access to Canada's fresh water resources.

"With climate change and growing needs," Lougheed wrote, "Canadians will need all the fresh water we can conserve, particularly in the Western provinces."

He added that his political instincts tell him that, given the growing water shortages in the U.S., "water availability is going to rise to the top of the U.S. domestic agenda" and with it strong pressure to compel Canada to share its "excess" water with parched Americans.

Lougheed argued that, in the near future, fresh water will become a more valuable commodity than oil, and that Canada should resist a U.S. grab of this valuable resource. So far, so good. But Lougheed erred when he went on to declare that Canadian trade negotiators denied a U.S. demand that fresh water should be covered by the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and later by NAFTA. "Fresh water," he wrote, "was not included in the free trade deal."

Unfortunately, he's wrong. As veteran Canadian trade negotiator MeI Clark pointed out in The Monitor five years ago, "the Canadian government, when it signed NAFTA, effectively yielded control of our country's water to the United States."

Clark went on to make the following points:

Now that the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)-which did specifically assure Canada control of its water-has been superseded by NAFTA, Americans have been given the same rights as Canadians to our water. NAFTA cancels our right to tax water exports to the U.S., overrides the constitutional right of the provinces to control the water within their boundaries, and accords to U.S. corporations the right to sue the federal government if it-or a province-fails to respect the terms of NAFTA. Nowhere in NAFTA is there any wording that gives Ottawa or the provinces the right to limit or embargo water exports to the U.S.

To be specific, the NAFTA provisions giving Americans control of Canada's water are Tariff Heading 22. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

EDITORIAL: Lougheed Was Right about U.S. Thirst for Our Water-But Wrong on NAFTA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.