Senate Foreign Relations Committee Passes CWC Ratification Resolution

By Podlich, Heather | Arms Control Today, April 1996 | Go to article overview

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Passes CWC Ratification Resolution


Podlich, Heather, Arms Control Today


ONLY DAYS before the deadline for completing its consideration of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on April 25 approved a resolution of ratification to the treaty by a vote of 13-5. The full Senate will vote on the resolution after Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS) places it on the Senate's executive calendar for action, a step he had not taken by April 30.

The CWC, signed in January 1993 by 130 countries including the United States, bans the use, production, stockpiling and development of poison gas, and requires parties to destroy their chemical weapons and production facilities. The Clinton administration formally transmitted the treaty to the Senate for its advice and consent to ratification in November 1993.

In approving the resolution, sponsored by Senators Richard Lugar (R-IN), Claiborne Pell (D-RI), Nancy Kassebaum (R-KS), Joseph Biden (D-DE) and John Kerry (D-MA), the committee rejected a resolution backed by committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-NC), who had earlier delayed action on the treaty because of a dispute with the Clinton administration over the reorganization of the executive branch's foreign affairs agencies.

The resolution contains seven conditions, which are binding upon the president, and 11 declarations, which are non-binding but express the intent of the Senate. Included in the conditions are requirements of: full U.S. participation in all CWC amendment conferences to ensure that no amendment enters into force without U.S. approval; presidential certification that Russia has complied satisfactorily with the data declaration requirements of the September 1989 U.S.-Soviet Wyoming Memorandum of Understanding or submission of a report outlining any discrepancies in Russian data; presidential certification, before the deposit of the U.S. instrument of ratification, that the U.S.Russian Bilateral Destruction Agreement has been or will shortly be concluded and its verification procedures will meet or exceed those of the CWC; and an understanding that the deposit of the U.S. instrument of ratification is not contingent on U.S. financial guarantees to pay for the CWC implementation costs borne by Russia or any other party.

Included in the 11 declarations are statements on U.S. retaliatory policy, U.S. chemical defense programs, assistance to Russia, expansion of the chemical weapon arsenals of non-parties and Russian noncompliance.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Passes CWC Ratification Resolution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.