THE ACCIDENTAL AMERICAN: Tony Blair and the Presidency

By Naughtie, James; Sandbrook, Dominic | International Journal, Autumn 2005 | Go to article overview

THE ACCIDENTAL AMERICAN: Tony Blair and the Presidency


Naughtie, James, Sandbrook, Dominic, International Journal


THE ACCIDENT ALAMERICAN Tony Blair and the Presidency James Naughtie New York: PublicAffairs, 2004. xx, 25opp, $36.95 cloth (ISBN 1-58648-257-2)

For many observers, one of the most puzzling things about the American-led invasion of Iraq in the spring of 2003 was the extremely close relationship between its two principal advocates: George W. Bush, the president of the United States and a right-wing Republican from Texas; and Tony Blair, the British prime minister and the leader of a Labour Party still nominally attached to its socialist traditions. In TAe Accidental American, the British journalist and broadcaster James Naughtie tries to explain to American readers precisely why Blair and Bush ended up as close allies, what the consequences were for the two men (and the world), and what this all tells us about Anglo-American politics and the so-called special relationship in the early 21st century.

Naughtie's book, while clearly and crisply written, is nevertheless disappointingly short (just 250 pages, including index), and comes without a scholarly apparatus of any kind. This is hardly surprising since Naughtie is a journalist, not an academic, and is trying to reach an educated popular audience rather than a readership of a few hundred academic experts. That such an audience exists at all is something of a marvel: it is hard to imagine a similar book being published in the United States about, say, John Major or James Callaghan. Indeed, Blair is unquestionably far more popular with Americans than among his own countrymen; although the Labour Party has enjoyed a consistent lead in the British polls since the early 19905, his own ratings took a severe buffeting after the war in Iraq and have yet to recover. Yet as Naughtie notes, Blair remains a perpetual surprise and an enigma on both sides of the Atlantic. His self-appointed task, therefore, is to explain to American readers precisely how and why Blair became the "accidental American."

In other words, Blair's Americanism did not begin, as Naughtie suggests, when he took office in 1997.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE ACCIDENTAL AMERICAN: Tony Blair and the Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.