American -- Cross, Crozier, and Crucible: A Volume Celebrating the Bicentennial of a Catholic Diocese in Louisiana Edited by Glenn R. Conrad

By Namorato, Michael V. | The Catholic Historical Review, April 1996 | Go to article overview

American -- Cross, Crozier, and Crucible: A Volume Celebrating the Bicentennial of a Catholic Diocese in Louisiana Edited by Glenn R. Conrad


Namorato, Michael V., The Catholic Historical Review


Cross, Crozier, and Crucible: A Volume Celebrating the Bicentennial of a Catholic Diocese in Louisiana. Edited by General Editor Glenn R. Conrad. Lafayette, Louisiana: The Archdiocese of New Orleans in cooperation with the Center for Louisiana Studies, University of Southwestern Louisiana. 1993. Pp. xxxii, 683, $35.00.)

As the title suggests, this work was put together to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the establishment of a Catholic diocese in Louisiana. The general editor, Glenn Conrad, was assisted by five associate editors, namely, Earl F. Niehaus, Alfred E. Lemmon, J. Edgar Bruns, Emilie Dietrich Griffin, and Charles Nolan. Each of the editors helped in organizing and bringing the project to completion in addition to writing some of the individual essays.

The book is divided into six sections. In all, thirty-nine contributors either researched or wrote the forty-six essays (including section introductions) in the volume. Part I looks at the ethnic breakdown of Louisiana historically. Part II examines the role of bishops and the growth of missions within the state. Part III analyzes efforts at evangelization and education, while Part IV concentrates on looking at specific individuals and movements and their contributions to Louisiana Catholicism. Finally, Part V explores the richness of Catholicism in Louisiana's fine arts, while Part VT provides an extensive bibliographical essay. The book concludes with an epilogue written by Archbishop Oscar Lipscomb, in which he provides his personal prognosis for Louisiana Catholicism based on the book's title, Cross, Crozier and Crucible. Undoubtedly, the book attempts to look at practically every aspect of the Louisiana Catholic Church within the last 200 years.

In evaluating Cross, Crozier and Crucible, the most outstanding characteristic of this work is its size. At 683 pages with a chronology, a brief photo essay, an appendix on bishops and archbishops of Louisiana, and an index, the book is massive.

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