Letters

The Saturday Evening Post, July/August 1996 | Go to article overview

Letters


Benefits of Magnesium

, After much too long a delay, I would like to tell you how your magazine has helped me. Back in the late 1980s, I began to read about the importance of magnesium in treating cardiovascular disease. One article, "The Case for Magnesium" (May/June '86), and others that followed got my attention.

My blood pressure was running high, and I had taken several kinds of medicine, but it did not come down very much. I had taken calcium for many years, but no magnesium. I decided to try taking magnesium supplements and later found a formula of calcium and magnesium I take every day.

After a while I went to my doctor for a checkup. She asked how I was feeling, and I replied, "I am feeling so good that I can hardly stand it," then explained what I had done on my own. My blood pressure was the lowest it had ever been in her office. We decided that I could stop taking blood pressure medicine when I ran out. I have not taken any BP medicine for about a year. I celebrated my 90th birthday March 8, 1996. Thank you for helping me to better health.

Lucille B. Haygood Old Hickory, Tennessee Healing Touch

Eagerly, I await the arrival of each issue of The Saturday Evening Post. It is such a satisfying magazine that I read all the articles.

When the May/June '96 issue arrived, as always I was pleased with its contents. However, it is "The Family is Bigger than You Think" by Dr. William G. Enright that was so outstanding. I read it twice! He emphasized God, love, and the church as the necessary family support and foundation. Prayerfully, more people will realize this truth and act accordingly.

Thank you for such an excellent magazine.

Carmen Harris Buffalo, New York

What a joy to read the sermon by Dr. William G. Enright (May/June '96). So fitting for today. If everyone who claimed to be God's child would follow the words, what a difference it would make in our country.

I'm reminded of II Chronicles, chapter 7, verse 14, which reads:

"If my people which are called by my name shall humble themselves and pray, and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sins, and will heal their land."

How much our country needs healing.

Zella M. Rease Coleman, Michigan Case Histories Abound

When I read an old copy of The Saturday Evening Post (July/August '95) at the doctor's office concerning the lysine research, I thought of writing you a letter.

I remember suffering from this frustrating nuisance of fever blisters since age ten. I am originally from India. The blister attack was very severe in the winter months; the winter is very mild in India.

I came to the U.S. in 1971; ever since, it was not a disease of the winter months, but all through the year.

It began to break out under stress, not only on the lips but on other parts of the face. Though I could sense the arrival of the blisters by the dry feeling in the area, I was helpless. I had applied certain external applications which gave some relief in breaking the skin.

When I read about lysine about 18 years back, I began to use it, and the result was marvelous. Indeed, I have told many people with chronic fever blister problems to take lysine. They were helped.

While I was working in a hospital, I remember this beautiful lady with blisters. She listened to my advice, and every time when I see her, she thanks me for telling her about it. I eat lysine-rich food to prevent the attack, and it is keeping me away from the attack. I may get a blister once in a year, but taking 500 mg of lysine three times a day for a couple of days keeps the disease away.

A. S. Mathew Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia High-Lysine Corn Crop

I am writing to you concerning the use of the high-lysine corn. Previously, in your magazine, you have praised the advantages of using this type of corn as a high nutritional product.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.