It's a Child's World after All

The Saturday Evening Post, July/August 1996 | Go to article overview

It's a Child's World after All


Nearly 1.3 million visitors each year explore the imaginative exhibits at the Children's Museum of Indianapolisthe world's largest children's museum. In the five-story, 356,000-square-foot facility, children of all ages (and parents) can explore the arts, foreign cultures, and history-as well as gain hands-on understanding of the fascinating world of physical and natural sciences. There are so many activities that the biggest challenge for families is which one to discover first!

How about a Fossil Dig, built to resemble the actual layers of limestone found in the earth-complete with fossils that "new geologists" can date to gain an in-depth knowledge of our common past? Crawl through a simulated mound of dirt to witness firsthand the animals that reside underground, or glimpse living plants and animals from atop and under an Indiana pond. One can even scale a 20foot limestone rock wall at the new ScienceWorks-a $2.5 million state-ofthe-art science gallery that opened in June. Also in 1996, the Children's Museum unveiled the IWERKS CineDome Theater-Indiana's first high-tech, largeformat theater, seating more than 300 people in a 76-foot-high dome. From June until January 1997, the museum is host to the first major fine-arts exhibit to appear in a children's museum with "Calder's Art: A Circus of Creativity. …

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