Students Look to Friends, Family to Choose a College

Black Issues in Higher Education, January 3, 2002 | Go to article overview
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Students Look to Friends, Family to Choose a College


IOWA CITY, IOWA

College-bound students rely most heavily on parents, family and friends when it comes to developing a list of schools to consider, according to surveys conducted by consulting firm Noel-Levitz. And academic program availability is by far the most important feature they are looking for when deciding whether a college is included on their list of choices.

The study is based on responses to seven separate telephone surveys, with responses from a total of 2,360 collegebound students between September 2000 and March 2001.

A majority of the survey respondents said that people familiar to them assisted them in developing their initial list of schools, followed closely by high school personnel including counselors, teachers and coaches. Other resources used included college publications and college personnel. While only 12 percent of the survey respondents used the Web to develop their initial list of schools, 30 percent said they used the Web to conduct further research of possible college choices.

Asked which features a school should have to be included on their list of possible colleges or universities, academic program availability was mentioned more than 50 percent of the time.

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Students Look to Friends, Family to Choose a College
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