Editorial

By Kurkjian, Catherine | New England Reading Association Journal, January 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Kurkjian, Catherine, New England Reading Association Journal


As we "bundle up" and brace ourselves for the long New England winter we have lots of "food for thought" to sustain us in this first issue of the new year. The special topic "from writing to reading and reading to writing" provides us with a diversity of perspectives on the writing/reading classroom, yet the power of literature to touch our lives is a common thread woven throughout all of the pieces presented.

Starting with Siu-Runyan's provocative article entitled, Where has all the "real" reading and writing gone: Reawakening to what we already know, we are reminded of the political nature of literacy within a democratic society. In this framework Siu-Runyan supplies us with a range of teaching strategies and books to use to support reading and writing. Whether we agree or disagree with the positions taken, we are challenged to take a critical stance toward our own work.

Linda Rief invites us into her classroom at Oyster River Middle School in Durham, New Hampshire in Passionate teaching, passionate reading: Excerpts from Voices from the Middle (NOTE, December, 2000). Rief discovers the power of literature as she explores her students' writing in response to read alouds, read alongs and to her students' independent reading. Rief's compelling story of her work helps our brains to do "backflips."

Next we find ourselves in a college classroom with teachers enrolled in graduate class on Reading and Writing Connections. In Marcia Bahgban's Teachers reading and writing together: What we learned from authors' lives she shares how the study of literature and the lives of authors fuel teachers' writing and teaching. In this piece we see how stories, our own and those of other writers, can be an important resource for our teaching.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Editorial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.