Two Gentle Men: The Lives of George Herbert and Robert Herrick

By Marchette Chute | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER ONE

GEORGE HERBERT CAME OF A LONG LINE OF WARRIORS. HIS great-great-grandfather passed into renown and Hall Chronicles by fighting his way through a whole army and back again. His father was attacked in a churchyard and, with his skull split through to the brain, routed his adversaries and walked victoriously home. His own brothers were notable swordsmen and the ones who took up the trade of soldiering showed the courage of their ancestors. William, fighting in the wars in Denmark, overcame his opponent with a broken sword; Thomas, in the East Indies, took command of his ship when the captain was killed and forced the Spanish enemy aground; and Richard, when he died, bore the scars of twenty-four wounds.

Out of this military family came George Herbert, who was a poet and in the end something of a saint. He fought a different kind of warfare in his short life, one not less difficult than over- coming an enemy with a sword. He never conquered a city, but he became a ruler of words and of his own spirit.

The Herberts were descended from a French family that could trace its lineage back to the Emperor Charlemagne. The first of the line in England was a friend of William the Conqueror, and the lands that were granted to Herbert the Chamberlain are recorded in the Domesday Book. His descendants became prominent in both England and Wales, and it was the Welsh side of the family that produced George Herbert.

The most famous of his ancestors was Sir Richard Herbert of Colebrook, a magnificent young Welsh giant who fought at the side of his elder brother, the Earl of Pembroke. It was Sir Richard who entered the history books by hacking his way single-handed through an entire army, and he was so beloved that after his

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Two Gentle Men: The Lives of George Herbert and Robert Herrick
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 319

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.