Journals and Journeymen: A Contribution to the History of Early American Newspapers

By Clarence Brigham | Go to book overview

Illustration

UNDER THIS HEADING is taken up all designs and representations, outside of printers' ornaments known as "flowers." The earliest illustration in an American newspaper is that of a flag--a woodcut in the Boston News-Letter of January 26, 1708. The article prints a proclamation of Queen Anne declaring what ensigns or colors should be carried by British merchant vessels. It is accompanied by a drawing of a flag about two inches wide, describing by lettering the red background and the crossing of blue and white stripes in the upper left canton. It is evidently the work of a Boston woodcut engraver, faithfully copying a design in the London Gazette of August 11, 1707, accompanying the printing of a proclamation by Queen Anne dated July 28, 1707. I have seen the original broadside proclamation in the collection of Lord Crawford in England, and the Antiquarian Society has the London Gazette.

The earliest ornamental designs were the woodcut devices used in the headings of newspapers. The News-Letter possessed no such device for over half a century. The Boston Gazette, established December 21, 1719, the second American newspaper (by

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Journals and Journeymen: A Contribution to the History of Early American Newspapers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Publications ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction ix
  • History of Early Newspapers 1
  • Titles of Newspapers 12
  • Newspaper Vs. Magazine 15
  • Circulation 19
  • Subscription Worries 23
  • Advertisements 27
  • Illustration 37
  • The Time-Lag in News 55
  • Women Newspaper Publishers 71
  • Marriage and Death Records 80
  • Carriers' Addresses 84
  • William Goddard's Additions to Thomas' History of Printing 99
  • News Rooms 108
  • Early Collections of Newspapers 110
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