The Essentials of Aesthetics in Music, Poetry, Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

By George Lansing Raymond | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER VI. ART AS REPRESENTATIVE RATHER THAN IMITATIVE OF NATURAL APPEARANCES.

Representation Contrasted with Imitation -- Co-ordinated with Requirements of Imagination -- Of Sympathy -- Representation versus Imitation in Music -- Representation in Music of Intonations of Speech -- Of Natural Humming and of Surrounding Sounds -- Representations of Nature in the Sounds and Figures of Poetry -- In its General Themes -- Representations of Nature in Painting and Sculpture -- While Sometimes Imitative, These Are Always Representative -- Shown in the Results of the Study of Values -- Of Light and Shade -- Of Shape and Texture -- Of Distance, and the Classic and Impressionist Line -- Of Aëial Perspective -- Of Lineal Perspective -- Of Life and Movement -- Explaining Occasional Lack of Accuracy -- Same Principles Applied to Sculpture -- Representation rather than Imitation of Primitive Architecture as in Huts, Tents, etc. -- Architectural Perspective as Applied by the Greeks -- Explaining Differences in Measurements of Similar Features in the Same Building -- Differences in Measurements of Corresponding Features in Different Buildings -- Representation not Imitation the Artist's Aim in Reproducing Forms in Architecture.

THE truth of the statements made at the close of the preceding chapter will be illustrated in this by showing their applicability to the method in which art deals with the sights or sounds of nature. According to Webster, to represent means "to present again either by image, by action, by symbol, or by substitute," and there is no possible use of natural forms in art that cannot be included under one of these heads. Imitation, which is, undoubtedly, a frequent process in art, can be included

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