Twentieth-Century Culture: Modernism to Deconstruction

By Norman F. Cantor | Go to book overview

List of Illustrations
Vincent Van Gogh, The Night Café, 1888 Oil on canvas, 28⅟″ × 36¼″ Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven. Bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark, B.A. 1903 Photo: Joseph Szaszfai
Edvard Munch, The Shriek, 1896 Lithograph, 13 15/16″ × 10″ Collection, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Matthew T. Mellon Fund.
Gustav Klimt, Fulfillment I, Stoclet Frieze, 1905 Mixed media with silver and golf leaf on paper, 194 cm × 121 cm Graphische Sammlung Albertina, Vienna. Photo: Courtesy St. Galerie Etienne, New York
Paul Gauguin, The Moon and the Earth, 1893 Oil on burlap, 45″ × 24⅟″ Collection, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Lillie P. Bliss Collection.
Henri Rousseau, The Dream, 1910 Oil on canvas, 80⅟″ × 117⅟″ Collection, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller.
Ernst Kirchner, Girl Under a Japanese Umbrella, 1909 Oil on canvas Kunstsammlung, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf. Photo: Walter Klein
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte Victoire, 1902-04 Oil on canvas, 27⅟″ × 35¼″ Philadelphia Museum of Art. George W. Elkins Collection
Henri Matisse, The Moroccans, 1916 Oil on canvas, 71 3/8″ × 9′ 2″ Collection, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Marx.
Georges Braque, The Portuguese, 1911 46 1/8″ × 32″ Kunstsammlung, Basel.
Jean Metzinger, Portrait of Albert Gleizes, 1912 Oil on canvas, 25⅟″ × 24¼″ Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island. Museum Purchase 1966.

-xiii-

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Twentieth-Century Culture: Modernism to Deconstruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xiii
  • 1 - The Nineteenth-Century Foundations of Twentieth-Century Culture 1
  • 2 - Modernism 35
  • 3 - Psychoanalysis 135
  • 4 - Marxism and the Left 183
  • 5 - Traditions on the Right 261
  • 6 - Structuralism, Deconstruction, and Post-Modernism 337
  • Conclusion 391
  • Cultural Analysis through Film 405
  • Select Bibliography 419
  • Index 429
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