The Quiet Voices: Southern Rabbis and Black Civil Rights, 1880s to 1990s

By Mark K. Bauman; Berkley Kalin | Go to book overview

Contributors

Terry Barr obtained his B.A. degree in English and political science from the University of Montevallo and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, concentrating on twentieth-century literature and film studies. He is currently associate professor of English at Presbyterian College. His article, "Stars, Light, and Finding the Way Home: The Emergence of Jewish Characters in Contemporary Film and Television," appeared in the spring 1993 issue of Studies in Popular Culture. He is presently working on a longer study tracing the proliferation of contemporary Jewish American films.

Mark K. Bauman holds a B.A. degree from Wilkes University, M.A. degrees from Lehigh and the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. from Emory University. A professor of history at Atlanta Metropolitan College, he has published biographies of conservative Southern Methodist Bishop Warren Candler ( 1981) and Rabbi Harry H. Epstein of Atlanta ( 1994) as well as more than two dozen articles in professional journals and anthologies. He served as guest editor of a special issue of American Jewish History (Autumn 1989) on the use of role theory to understand American Jewish history, and he edited the journal of the Georgia Association of Historians from 1991 to 1994. His most recent publication is an American Jewish Archives brochure titled "The Southerner as American: Jewish Style" ( 1996). Bauman's research concerns interaction between and within ethnic groups and identifying patterns to explicate behavior. He was president of the Georgia Association of Historians. ( 1996-97)

Myron Berman, adjunct professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, served as the rabbi of Richmond's Temple Beth El for twenty-eight years. He holds master's and doctorate degrees from Columbia University; M.H.L, B.H.L., and D.D. (honoris causa) degrees from Jewish Theological Seminary; and a B.S.S. from City College of New York (now CUNY). He is the author of a history of the Jews of Richmond ( 1979) and is currently working on "The Last of the Jews: The Century and One-half Social History of a Southern Jewish Family."

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