Separation of Powers--Does it Still Work?

By Robert A. Goldwin; Art Kaufman | Go to book overview

strengthening congressional leadership, but that case must rest on grounds other than the alleged defects of the separation of powers. Many of the supporters of a strong presidency have finally acknowledged that party government--for decades their rallying cry--will not serve their ends. And so they have turned to a different means--constitutional amendment. But it is a more risky strategy. We could learn from experience about the role of parties without having to make fundamental changes in the regime. To learn from experience about constitutional "reform," we will have to take a precipitous leap into the dark.


Notes
1.
James MacGregor Burns, The Deadlock of Democracy: Four-Party Politics in America ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1963), pp. 325-26. See also E. E. Schattschneider , Party Government ( New York: Farrar and Rinehart, 1942).
2.
James Bryce, The American Commonwealth, 3d ed. ( New York: Macmillan, 1909), vol. 1, p. 530.
3.
Henry Jones Ford, The Rise and Growth of American Politics ( London: Macmillan, 1900), p. 300.
4.
Ibid., pp. 297-98.
5.
Ibid., pp. 325, 310.
6.
George Rothwell Brown, The Leadership of Congress ( Indianapolis, Ind.: Bobbs-Merrill, 1922), p. 100.
7.
Julius Turner, with Edward V. Schneier Jr., Party and Constituency: Pressures on Congress, rev. ed. ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1970), p. 16.
8.
David W. Brady, Joseph Cooper, and Patricia A. Hurley, "The Decline of Party in the U.S. House of Representatives, 1887-1968," Legislative Studies Quarterly, vol. 4 ( 1979), pp. 381-407.
9.
Melissa P. Collie, "Policy Dimensional Analysis and the Structure of Voting Patterns: The U.S. House of Representatives in Three Periods" (Paper presented to the 1983 annual meeting of the American Political Science Association). See also Aage Clausen, How Congressmen Vote ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1973).
10.
Anthony King, "The American Polity in the Late 1970s: Building Coalitions in the Sand," in Anthony King, ed., The New American Political System ( Washington, D.C.: American Enterprise Institute, 1978), pp. 371-95.
11.
R. Douglas Arnold, Congress and the Bureaucracy: A Theory of Influence ( New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1979), p. 210; and Barbara Sinclair , "Coping with Uncertainty: Building Coalitions in the House and Senate," in Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein, eds., The New Congress ( Washington, D.C.: American Enterprise Institute, 1981), pp. 178-220. See also Barbara Sinclair, Congressional Realignment, 1925- 1978 ( Austin: University of Texas Press, 1982).
12.
Kay Lehman Schlozman and John T. Tierney, Organized Interests andAmerican Democracy

-36-

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Separation of Powers--Does it Still Work?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Editors and the Authors vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - To Form a Government 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Political Parties and the Separation of Powers 18
  • Notes 36
  • 3 - The Renewal of American Constitutionalism 38
  • Conclusion 60
  • Notes 62
  • 4 - The Separation of Powers and Modern Forms of Democratic Government 65
  • Conclusions 83
  • Notes 85
  • 5 - The Separation of Powers Needs Major Revision 90
  • Conclusion 113
  • 6 - The Separation of Powers and Foreign Affairs 118
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - A 1787 Perspective on Separation of Powers 138
  • 8 - In Defense of Separation of Powers 168
  • Notes 191
  • A Note on the Book 195
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