Toni Morrison's World of Fiction

By Karen Carmean | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Introduction

Toni Morrison has said that she "never planned to be a writer."1 The closest her ambitions took her to a creative life was an early dream of becoming a dancer. But her destiny was writing, even if she didn't know it for a long time. Finally, in her late thirties, she found that writing was not only pleasurable but also necessary for her. Prior to starting her writing career Morrison was increasingly bothered by the feeling that life had somehow passed her by. "I used to really belong in this world," she thought to herself, but "at some point I didn't belong here anymore."2 The experience of working on her first novel changed all that. As she poured her imagination into her story, and the characters took on life, she became aware of the miraculous rewards of the creative act. "I was everybody," she discovered. "And I fell in love with myself. I reclaimed myself and the world."3 Moreover, she discovered that writing "was a way of knowing, a way of thinking" that she found "really necessary." 4 Since then, guided by these feelings, Morrison has gone on to write so impressively that she is now recognized as one of the foremost novelists of her time.

Morrison was born Chloe Anthony Wofford on February 18, 1931, in Lorain, Ohio, the second of four children. Both her parents had arrived in this steel mill town on the banks of Lake Erie from the South. Since they happened to be black, they thought of the South not as home but as a region from which they had escaped. Morrison's father had left Georgia because of racist atrocities which haunted him all his life. Thus he became a racist himself, believing he was justified in hating all whites,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Toni Morrison's World of Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Bluest Eye 18
  • Chapter 3 - Sula 31
  • Chapter 4 - Song of Solomon 45
  • Chapter 5 - Tar Baby 62
  • Chapter 6 - Trilogy in Progress: Beloved and Jazz 81
  • Notes 105
  • Bibliography 111
  • Index 126
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 132

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.