The Armed Forces of the USA in the Asia-Pacific Region

By Stanley B. Weeks; Charles A. Meconis | Go to book overview

4
US base infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific region
In the course of World War II and the subsequent 45 years of the Cold War, the United States established a vast network of military bases at home and overseas (see Chapter 1). In the Asia- Pacific region, that network stretched from the west coast of the continental United States to the Asian mainland. As the end of the 20th century approaches, a broad spectrum of geo-political, economic and military factors has led to a steady reduction in that global network from a total of 115 major overseas air and sea bases in 1956 to 27 in 1997. 1 Still, the United States at the time of writing maintains a significant base infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific region. This chapter briefly reviews that infrastructure. The discussion is limited to major or particularly significant bases on the west coast of the US mainland, Hawaii, and in the Western Pacific region that provide forces and training to the US Pacific Command, as shown in the map in Figure 4.1. Details about the units stationed at these bases can be found in the following chapters devoted to individual branches of the US armed forces.
BASES IN THE CONTINENTAL US, ALASKA AND HAWAII
The United States has an extensive sovereign presence in the Eastern Pacific--a geographic fact that ensures a permanent military infrastructure. In the far north, Alaska, with its far-flung Aleutian archipelago, was the site of combat during World War II and frequent confrontational incidents during the Cold War. Although the end of the Cold War has led to significant base closings, a number of major bases remain active. They consist of:
ā€¢ Eielson Air Force base, located in the interior of Alaska, about

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The Armed Forces of the USA in the Asia-Pacific Region
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables, Figures and Maps viii
  • Glossary of Acronyms ix
  • Preface xvii
  • Metric Conversion Table xx
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - A Brief History of the Us Military Presence 6
  • Summary 29
  • 2 - Us Interests and Strategic Policy 30
  • 3 - National Command and Control and Us Pacific Command 65
  • 4 - Us Base Infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific Region 82
  • Summary 97
  • 5 - Us Nuclear Forces 99
  • 6 - Us Navy and Us Marine Corps 122
  • 7 - Us Air Force and Us Space Command 157
  • Summary 182
  • 8 - Us Army and Us Special Operations Command 184
  • Summary 211
  • 9 - The Future of Us Armed Forces 212
  • Summary 234
  • 10 - Conclusion 235
  • Appendix 252
  • Notes 256
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 293
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