Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy

By F. M. Kamm | Go to book overview

The Value of Pregnancy

Let us return to TEG for fetuses. The loss to at least some women of not carrying a fetus in their own bodies may be so great--even though with TEG this no longer means not having a genetically related child--that they would rather not have children than have them in TEG. But by not having children they will suffer a large personal cost and also prevent the existence of a new life. The violinist will be plugged into the machine if not into the man, but there will be no fetus to plug into a machine if the woman refuses the options of using a TEG or being committed to an uninterruptable pregnancy. Given these costs (no fetus, unhappy woman), should we refuse to raise the requirements of pregnancy so as to ensure the same outcome as we could achieve by using a machine?

Unless there is a shortage of children, the threat of not having a child is not very effective, especially because there is no person who is literally deprived by not being created. We therefore are left with the costs to the woman as the dominant consideration.

We need to decide in regard to machine substitutes, whether there is a morally crucial difference between pregnancy and the case of the violinist. This difference may be that once again, the standard to which parents and bearers are held when we decide what they are obligated to do for their offspring is not set by the best that would be done for the offspring by others. Why is this? Both the desire of some people to bear children in their bodies and the cost to them of not having children in this way are so significant that they compete with the interests of the fetus. This may account for the permissibility of not having to sacrifice a womb pregnancy and of our not raising the amount of risk that women must take during that pregnancy in order to match the good outcome of a machine. (What may have been left out of this discussion is the concern about who will gain control over children not bonded early on to women. If this is a dangerous prospect, there will be another reason not to hold women to the standard of the machine.)


Notes
1.
In fact, the procedures for providing patients with enough information to give an informed consent are probably inadequate. The failure to give data

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - May We Kill in Nonabortion Cases? 20
  • Notes 39
  • 2 - Applying the Argument to Specific Nonabortion Cases 42
  • Notes 63
  • 3 - Variations and Alternatives 64
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - May We Kill in Abortion Cases? 78
  • Notes 120
  • 5 - Creating Responsibly 124
  • Notes 182
  • 6 - Informed Consent, Responsibilities in Pregnancy, and External Means of Gestation 186
  • Notes 218
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.