Modern Trends in World Religions

By A. Eustace Haydon | Go to book overview

XXI
THE TASK OF JUDAISM BY SOLOMON GOLDMAN

IN SPEAKING of the Judaism of the future, I concern myself, of course, with the social message of Judaism; and the social message of Judaism of the future will, perhaps, not be different from the social message of other religions. And, therefore, I shall speak in a general way of the religion of the future, with special reference from time to time to Judaism.

The task of modern religion, it seems to me, is to secure for man the values promised by the old religions. Thus, the task of modern religion is not altogether different from the task of religion in the ancient world. In recorded history, environment has changed for a large part of the world's population. But the human factor has not suffered perceptible metamorphosis. Abraham and his contemporaries in Ur would probably have agreed that what they wanted to wrest from life was security, truth, goodness, and beauty. Abraham, even though not an Athenian, was not indifferent to the comely Sarah. There is, perhaps, sufficient evidence to assume that the patriarch was not averse to goodness or truth.

Most normal men in our own day are in search of happiness. A little probing would reveal that what they understand by happiness is the fusion of security, goodness, truth, and beauty. Those who possessed the intelligence to formulate their desires in logical statement have as a rule quested for little more. Scores of articles and numerous books entitled "What I Believe," "My Utopia," "The Next Step in Religion," "Religion Coming of Age," "TheFuture of Society,"

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