Mary Barton

By Elizabeth Gaskell ; Edgar Wright | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF
ELIZABETH GASKELL
1810 29 September. Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson born to William
Stevenson and Elizabeth Holland, in Lindsey Row, Chelsea
(now Cheyne Walk); she has one brother, John (b. 1798).
1811 29 October. Her mother, Elizabeth Stevenson, dies in Chelsea.
Soon afterwards the baby Elizabeth is taken to Knutsford,
Cheshire to be cared for by her mother's elder sister, Hannah
Lumb.
1814 William Stevenson marries Catherine Thomson.
1821 Elizabeth goes to a boarding-school near Warwick run by the
Byerley sisters, relations of her stepmother and of the Wedg-
wood family.
1822 Her brother John Stevenson joins the Merchant Navy.
1824 The school moves to Stratford-upon-Avon.
1826 Elizabeth leaves school.
1828 John Stevenson disappears either while on his way to India or
after his arrival there. Nothing is ever known of his fate.
1829 22 March. Death of William Stevenson.
Elizabeth is thought to have spent the winter, and that of
1830-1, with relations, the Turners, in Newcastle upon Tyne
and to have visited Edinburgh with Ann Turner, probably in
1830 or 1831.
1831 Meets the Revd William Gaskell ( 1805-84).
1832 30 August. Marries William Gaskell at St John's Parish Church,
Knutsford. They live at 1 Dover Street, Manchester, where he is
assistant minister at Cross Street Chapel.
1833 10 July. Birth of a stillborn girl.
1834 12 September. Birth of Marianne Gaskell.
1837 January. Publication of the Gaskells' poem "Sketches among the
Poor" in Blackwood's Magazine.
7 February. Birth of Margaret Emily (Meta) Gaskell.
1 May. Death of Hannah Lumb.
1840 William Howitt, Visits to Remarkable Places includes her descrip

-xxix-

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Mary Barton
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxiv
  • A Chronology of Elizabeth Gaskell xxix
  • Preface xxxv
  • Contents xxxvii
  • Chapter VI 63
  • Chapter VIII 93
  • Chapter X 130
  • Chapter XI 146
  • Chapter XIII 173
  • Chapter XIV 184
  • Chapter XVIII 237
  • Chapter XXV 323
  • Chapter XXIX 354
  • Chapter XXXI 366
  • Chapter XXXII 372
  • Chapter XXXIV 409
  • Appendix A the Original Rough Sketch for Mary Barton 465
  • Explanatory Notes 475
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