History of Labour in the United States - Vol. 2

By John R. Commons; David J. Saposs et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
THE NATIONAL LABOR UNION, 1866-1872

The Labour Movement in Europe and America. Eight-hour question, 87. Ira Steward and his wage theory, 87. Stewardism contrasted with socialism, 90. Stewardism and trade unionism, 91. Stewardism and political action, 91. Boston Labor Reform Association, 91. The Grand Eight Hour League of Massachusetts, 92. Massachusetts labour politics, 92. Labour politics in Philadelphia, 93. Fincher's opposition to politics, 93. Return of the soldiers -- a stimulus to the eight-hour movement, 94. The question of national federation, 94. The move by trades' assemblies, 94. New York State Workingmen's Assembly, 95. The move by the national trade unions, 96. The compromise, 96.

Labor Congress of 1866. Representation, 96. Attitude toward trade unionism and legislation, 98. Eight-hour question at the congress, 98. Resolution on political action, 99. Land question, 100. Co-operation, 101. Form of organisation, 101.

Eight Hours and Politics. Congressional election of 1866, 102. Independent politics outside Massachusetts, 103. Eight-hours before Congress, 104. Eight-hours before President Johnson, 104. Eight-hours before the General Court of Massachusetts, 105. Special commission of 1865 106. The commission of 1866, 107. E. H. Rogers, 107. Eight-hour bills in other States, 108. Causes of the failure, 109.

Co-operative Workshops. Productive co-operation in various trades, 111.

Labor Congress of 1867. Activity of the National Labor Union during the year, 112. Address to the Workingmen of the United States, 113. Viewpoint of the "producing classes," 114. Representation at the Congress of 1867, 115. The constitution, 116. The immigrant question and the American Emigrant Company, 117. The question of the Negro, 118.

Greenbackism. Popularity of greenbackism among the various elements at the Labor Congress, 119. A. C. Cameron, 119. Alexander Campbell, 120. The "new Kelloggism," 121. Greenbackism contrasted with socialism and anarchism, 121. Greenbackism as a remedy against depressions, 122. "Declaration of Principles," 122. The depression, 1866-1868, 123. Progress of co-operation, 124.

Eight Hours. Government employés and the eight-hour day, 124. Labor Congress of 1868, 125. Conference on the presidential election, 125. Representation at the congress, 126. Discussion on strikes, 129. The first lobbying committee, 130. Sylvis' presidency, 130.

The International Workingmen's Association. The international regulation of immigration, 131. Sylvis' attitude towards the international, 132. Sylvis' death, 132. Cameron's mission to Basle, 132.

Labor Congress of 1869. Representation, 133. Effect of Sylvis' death, 134.

-85-

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