History of Labour in the United States - Vol. 2

By John R. Commons; David J. Saposs et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS (FROM 1896)

Industrial Prosperity and the Growth of the Federation. The extension into new regions and into hitherto untouched trades, 522. Lack of success among the unskilled, 523. The Industrial Workers of the World, 523. The floaters and foreign-speaking workingmen, 523. Success of the miners, 523. The garment workers' unions, 524. Progress of the tradeagreement idea, 524. Its test during the anthracite miners' strike in 1902, 525. The manufacturers' control over access to the market, 525. The trust and its effect on unionism, 526. The "open shop movement," 526. Structural iron industry, 526. Trade-agreement outlook, 527. Awakening of the public to the existence of a labour question, 527. Evolution of public opinion since the eighties, 528. The public and labour legislation, 528. Organised labour's luke-warmness toward labour legislation, 529. Its cause, 529. Its effect on the administration of labour laws, 530. The courts, 530. The Danbury Hatters', the Adair, and Buck's Stove and Range cases, 530, The failure of lobbying, 531. "Reward your friends and punish your enemies," 531. Alliance with the Democrats, 531. The socialists, 532. Effect of litigation and politics on economic organisation, 533. Problem of the unskilled, 533. Three forms of industrialism, 533. The "one big union," 533. Industrialism of the middle stratum, 534. "Craft industrialism," 534. The National Building Trades' Council, 535. The Structural Building Trades' Alliance and the theory of "basic" unions, 535. The Building Trades' Department, 536. Other departments, 536. Forced amalgamations, 537. The new conception of "craft autonomy," 537. Probable future structure of American labour organisations, 537. The "concerted movement," 537.

BEGINNING in 1898 a distinctly new period emerged, but its facts are so recent that they belong more to a discussion of current problems than to a record of history. It remains only to connect them in a general way with the movements of preceding years.

In 1898 industrial prosperity returned, and with it, a rapid expansion of labour organisations. At no time in its history, not excepting the throbbing year of 1886, did labour organisation make such important gains as during the next five years. True, in none of these years did the labour movement add over half a million members as it had done in that memorable year; nevertheless, from the standpoint of permanency of achieve

-521-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of Labour in the United States - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.