MICHAEL
BAKUNIN

BY
E. H. CARR

VINTAGE BOOKS
A Division of Random House

NEW YORK

-iii-

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Michael Bakunin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Book I the Young Romantic 1
  • Chapter § 1 the Birth of a Rebel 3
  • Chapter § 2 Love and Metaphysics 20
  • Chapter § 3 High Summer of Romance 30
  • Chapter § 4 Autumnal Reality 41
  • Chapter § 5 Brother and Sisters 51
  • Chapter § 6 Hegel and Belinsky 61
  • Chapter § 7 Escape 76
  • Book II the Revolutionary Adventurer 95
  • Chapter § 8 Between Two Worlds 97
  • Chapter § 9 Farewell to Philosophy 111
  • Chapter § 10 Swiss Interlude 121
  • Chapter § 11 Life in Paris 131
  • Chapter § 12 Prelude to Revolution 146
  • Chapter § 13 1848 156
  • Chapter § 14 the Creed of a Revolutionary 175
  • Chapter § 15 Shipwreck 190
  • Book III Buried Alive 205
  • Chapter § 16 Saxony, Austria 207
  • Chapter § 17 Russia 221
  • Chapter § 18 Siberian Adventure 237
  • Book IV Redivivus 249
  • Chapter § 20 Political Ambitions 268
  • Chapter § 21 Poland 283
  • Chapter § 22 Swedish Episode 302
  • Chapter § 23 Florence 315
  • Chapter § 24 Naples 327
  • Book V Bakunin and Marx 339
  • Chapter § 25 the League of Peace and Freedom 341
  • Chapter § 26 the Birth of the Alliance 359
  • Chapter § 27 the Bâle Congress 375
  • Chapter § 28 the Affaire Nechaev 390
  • Chapter § 29 Fiasco at Lyons 410
  • Chapter § 30 the Forces of the Alliance 427
  • Chapter § 31 Marx Versus Bakunin 441
  • Book VI Last Years 459
  • Chapter § 32 Last Projects 461
  • Chapter § 33 Baronata 480
  • Chapter § 34 the Death of a Rentier 495
  • Bibliography 509
  • Index i
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