The National Recovery Administration: An Analysis and Appraisal

By Leverett S. Lyon; Paul T. Homan et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIX
POLICY AND DILEMMA

Partly as a result of such varied criticisms as have been indicated in the preceding chapter, partly as a result of a slowly dawning realization within the NRA itself that extended action without policy can lead only to confusion, there was established within the NRA in March 1934 a unit with definite responsibility for broad policy recommendations. In plan and by declaration this policyforming group was first outlined as three policy boards. NRA Office Order No. 74. declared that "in order to expedite and co-ordinate decisions of administrative policy (not only as to approved codes but as to codes in making and general policy questions as well)" three policy boards "are established. These boards will make recommendations to the Administrator and will advise division administrators on final decisions of policy on problems within their respective fields." Of these, one was called Trade Practice Policy Board. 1 Its duties were expressed in these words: "In general, this Board will consider all problems involving the trade practice provisions of codes. This Board will pay particular attention to problems of price stabilization, buying and selling provisions, cost, consumer protection, etc."

The order establishing this Board set up as its personnel, a chairman to be appointed by the Administrator and one representative each from the Labor, Industrial,

____________________
1
The general subject of this office order was "Reorganization for Code' Administration." In addition to the creation of a Trade Practice Policy Board it outlined the duties of a number of functionaries and boards and set up correlatively to the Trade Practice Policy Board a Labor Policy Board and a Code Authority Policy Board.

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