Henry Ford vs. Truman H. Newberry: The Famous Senate Election Contest: A Study in American Politics, Legislation and Justice

By Spencer Ervin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
Expenditures (continued)--The Amount and Character of the Expenditures--Blair Report Criticized --Alleged Illegalities

WITH the aid of the material in the last three chapters we should now be able to arrive at our own conclusion as to the approximate total of the expenditures in the Newberry primary campaign. The Blair Report shows $176,568.08, but, as will presently appear, errors in addition make the true total $595-93 more, or $177,164,01. To this must be added between $12,000 and $15,000 paid out, as mentioned in an earlier chapter,1 to meet "surprise" bills which came in after the Report had been filed. No list of these bills was available and we know only that most of them were for newspaper advertising,2 and that they included a relatively large figure for telegrams.3 Next, perhaps, we should add $5,083,73, the amount of the total deposited in and expended from the "Paul H. King, Chairman" account, because, although King and Floyd were positive that the amount had been included in the Blair Report, they could not prove the fact. The corrected total of the Blair Report, $177,164.01; the $15,000 approximate maximum of the late bills; and the $5,083.73 of the King account add up to $197,247.74, and this we think may fairly be taken as the maximum approximate expenditure in the primary campaign, with the probability that it was $5,083.73 less, or $192,164.01. The Minority Report from

____________________
1
Ante, Part 1, Chapter II, p. 22.
2
S. 645, King.
3
Ibid. The testimony as to these bills, their character and approximate amount, and the circumstances of their rendition and payment, will be found at B. 680 and S. 345, 346, 564-566, 625, 645-647, 709-710, 716. I have not thought it necessary to go into this testimony in detail because, except for a brief complaint by counsel for Mr. Ford (S. 716) and one by Senator Pomerene (C. R. Vol. 61, Part 8, 7836 b, d), the matter does not seem to have been made the subject of specific attack.

-213-

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