Ancient Israel: Its Life and Institutions

By Roland De Vaux ; John McHugh | Go to book overview

PREFACE

INSTITUTIONS are the various forms in which the social life of a people finds expression. Some it will take for granted as a matter of custom; others it will adopt of its own choice; and yet others will be imposed upon it by an authority. Individuals are subject to the nation's institutions, but the institutions themselves exist, ultimately, for the sake of the society whose welfare they promote, whether the society be small as a family, or large as a state or religious community. Again, the institutions of a society will vary with time and place, and will depend, to some extent, on natural conditions such as geography and climate, but their distinguishing characteristic is that they all proceed, in the end, from the human will.

The institutions of a people with a long past are therefore closely bound up not only with the territory in which it has lived but with history. They will be made to suit that people, and will bear the mark of its psychology, of its ideas on man, the world and God. Like its literature, its art, its science and religion, its institutions too are an element in, and an expression of, its civilization. In order to understand and describe these ancient witnesses to the life of a people, the historian has to take into account all the traces of the past. Clearly, written documents have pride of place, but the things which survive, even the humblest remains of man's labour, cannot be passed over. Everything is grist which will enable us to reconstruct the conditions and the setting of the people's social life.

Because of these various relations with other sciences, the institutions of Israel have usually been studied as part of a larger whole. Long treatises have been devoted to them in the classic historical works, the Geschichte des Volkes Israel by Rudolf Kittel, and especially in Schürer Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes for the last period of the Old Testament. Conversely, the recent studies by J. Pirenne on Les Institutions des Hébreux1 follow the historical development. Formerly, institutions were treated under the heading of Antiquitates Hebraicae, but nowadays they are associated with archaeology, and are thus presented by I. Benziger in Hebräische Archäologie, 3rd edition, 1927, by F. Nötscher in Biblische Altertumskunde, 1940, and by A. G. Barrois in Manuel d'Archéologie Biblique, I, 1939; II, 1953. Ample space is devoted to them in histories of civilization, such as A. Bertholet, Kulturgeschichte Israels, 1919, and J. Pedersen, Israel, its Life and Culture, I-II, 1926; III-IV, 1940.

____________________
1
Archives d'Histoire du Droit Oriental, IV, 1949, pp. 51-76; V, 1950, pp. 99-132; Revue Internationale des Droits de l'Antiquité, I, 1952, pp. 33-86; II, 1953, pp. 109-149; III, 1954, pp. 195-255.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ancient Israel: Its Life and Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 594

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.