Governors, Legislatures, and Budgets: Diversity across the American States

By Edward J. Clynch; Thomas P. Lauth | Go to book overview

8
Minnesota: Searching for Stability

JAMES E. JERNBERG

Minnesotans pay attention to state budgeting. Many believe that state government actions, reflected in the budget, have an impact on the quality of life in the state. 1 The state's citizens have long assigned a positive role to government spending to improve their collective quality of life, and have also shown a willingness to tax themselves to support that spending. Minnesota's personal income tax rates are among the highest in the nation, and spending for education, health, and human dignity services has always been above the national average. Public space has been reserved and developed for recreational use by both state and local governments. Infrastructure has been maintained and improved through the years.

This legacy, the civic culture of the state, the responsibility for which had been accepted and shared by people of nearly all political persuasions, has recently been challenged. The issue has usually been framed in terms of taxes, not unlike but less severe than the efforts to limit taxes in some other states ( California or Massachusetts) over the past decade. Concern over taxes places constraints on spending. Political issues in the 1970s centered on how and where to distribute increasing revenues. The political disposition to spend--public money for public purposes by public governments--is now being tempered by proposals to spend less and/or have public purposes carried out by the private sector. The appropriate future role of government as the instrument for carrying out public policy is now a topic of debate in the budget process. The progressive tradition, long part of the environment of state budgeting, can no longer be assumed. 2

Budgeting is not a technical exercise in Minnesota. It has become the focal point of major differences and disagreements over the role of the state in particular programs within a house, between houses, and between the governors and one or both houses, all depending on the party affiliations of the incumbents.

In recent years partisanship has been most evident in the areas of taxes, economic development, jobs and training programs, and assistance to the disadvantaged, where basic disagreements now exist over the most appropriate and effective measures to enhance the state's economy and the well-being of its people. Any

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Governors, Legislatures, and Budgets: Diversity across the American States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.