In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990

By Marcus Cunliffe | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

These essays comprise about half the ones I would like to have seen reprinted. However, they are a generous selection. What they may not fully reveal is the extent of my interest in the uniform-wearing Americans, professional and amateur, of the nineteenth century; in the evolution of the presidency; in certain cultural-literary-intellectual issues (touched upon most accessibly in the 4th, 1986 edition of my Penguin Literature of the United States, which Einaudi has brought out in a felicitous new translation [ 1990] by Massimo Bacigalupo and others); and in a quantity of material, still awaiting final form, on the history of the idea of private property in America. Otherwise I feel well represented, and am beholden to Greenwood Press for not grumbling at the largeness of the manuscript, as well as to the Greenwood series editor, Robert H. Walker, having first met him in Laramie, Wyoming, in 1958, when the United States and ourselves all seemed much younger.

Over such a span of time I have incurred hundred of debts, personal and institutional. I ask my innumerable benefactors will take the gratitude as read. Apart from Phyllis Palmer, to whom the book is dedicated, I must also pay special tribute to Nan Thompson Ernst. Without her editorial talents and sustaining good sense, In Search of America would have remained a jumble of papers, lacking order, bibliography or index.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.