In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990

By Marcus Cunliffe | Go to book overview

Introduction

A selection of essays -- even a rather large one -- only suggests the range of serious interests reflected in the career of Marcus Cunliffe. Here is a man who has studied, spoken, written, and published on Crèvecoeur and Stephen Crane, F. O. Matthiessen and James Madison, Mark Twain, and Frances Trollope. His most widely read works deal with literary history, military history in both its narrow and broad dimensions, George Washington, and the American presidency. He has published two ambitious period histories: 1789-1837 and 1848-1917. In addition, Cunliffe has produced substantial works on education, historiography, property, and republicanism.

The key to appreciating this personal intellectual history, however, only begins with an admiration for its breadth. There are a small number of large topics that have provided substantive focus within the canon. Furthermore, there is a remarkable consistency of tone. Over four decades, while literary theories and fashions in historical interpretation have brushed all colors of the spectrum, Cunliffe's irenic voice has maintained its own tenor, avoiding fads and controversy, beguiling auditors of every persuasion.

This Englishman's direct discovery of America started in 1947 with a two-year fellowship at Yale University. Thereafter his presence here, frequently as a visiting professor and since 1980 as a permanent resident, has made him the most American of Englishmen.

Moreover, as a student at Yale, Cunliffe was caught up very early in an excitingly controversial and thoroughly American intellectual movement. Introduced by David Potter to the sociological study of the American national character and by Ralph Gabriel to an original style of intellectual history, Cunliffe absorbed the new scholarship that was bringing out the unities in American culture, while playing down the sharp social conflicts that an older generation of

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Search of America: Transatlantic Essays, 1951-1990
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.