Renewing America's Progress: A Positive Solution to School Reform

By Fredric H. Genck | Go to book overview

7
Who: A Coalition of Citizens and Educators
Teachers should call for help from citizens. Those most likely to respond are the following:
Baby boomers who are ready for social responsibility, for giving something back to the community, as America shifts from the "me" generation of the 1980s to more community and environmental concerns in the 1990s
Young professionals who want public servants to be subject to the same expectations for performance and results that they experience in their own jobs, and who are anxious for their children to have the best possible education in a world of increasingly evident global economic competition
Older Americans who launched the taxpayer revolt, questioning whether we are getting our money's worth from our investment in schools and other public services, and who understand that public services must be well managed if America's social progress and economic success are to continue.

Americans, young and old, have time for both personal success and social contribution. Our survival, and leaving enough of the American Dream for our children to enjoy, depend on our success in this. We cannot allow community and environment to deteriorate further. Most often it is not the motives that are missing but the techniques, an omission I hope this book will help to overcome.

We need a coalition of citizens and educators -- parents, teachers, and students -- to meet the needs of everyone, inside and outside the system (see Figure 2). Every American citizen has an interest in public affairs and the quality of our public services. You might see this in yuppies working with disadvantaged inner-city youths, or in retired

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