American POWs of World War II: Forgotten Men Tell Their Stories

By Tom Bird | Go to book overview

cooperative response from professional associations. A group of 11 experts, the Hostage and Family Adjustment Committee, is now working with the joint support of the American Psychiatric Association and American Psychological Association. These professionals bring considerable expertise to the committee through their previous experience with prisoners of war, the Jonestown crisis, the Hanafi Muslim incident, Chowchilla school bus kidnapping, and other hostage situations. The purpose of the committee is to offer consultation and support to professionals working with the hostages and their families either under the auspices of the State Department or on a private basis.

"Happy endings" for survivors of all types of hostage situations will occur, not simply because they were released, but because they were assisted through the complex psychological readjustment process that follows by family members, friends, and professionals who understood what they have been through and responded sensitively and appropriately.


NOTES
1.
Weiss Paul. Idiocide. Evaluation and Change, special issue, 1980.
2.
Ibid.
3.
Richter Curt P. On the Phenomenon of Sudden Death in Animals and Men, Psychosomatic Medicine, 19 ( 3): 1957.
4.
Wittrig John, Mary M. Mehl, and Francis H. Deter. Developmental Stress, Emotionality and Survival: A New Test. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association, 1: 1965.
5.
Gostas Theodore W. Prisoner. New York: Western Publishing, 1974.
6.
Symonds Martin. The "Second Injury" to Victims and Acute Response of Victims to Terror. Evaluation and Change, special issue, 1980.
7.
Eitinger Leo, and Axel Strom. Mortality and Morbidity after Excessive Stress. New York: Humanities Press, 1973.
8.
Veterans Administration. Study of former Prisoners of War. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, May 1980.
9.
Fields Rona M. Victims of Terrorism: The Effects of Prolonged Stress. Evaluation and Change, special issue, 1980.
10.
Keehan Robert J. Follow-up Studies of World War II and Korean Conflict Prisoners. III Mortality to January 1, 1976. American Journal of Epidemiology, 3: February 1980.
11.
Selye Hans. The Stress of Life. New York: McGraw Hill, 1976.
12.
Rahe Richard H. "Life-change Patterns Surrounding Illness Experience". Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 8: 1964.
13.
Segal Julius, Edna J. Hunter, and Zelda Segal. Universal Consequences of Captivity. International Social Science Journal, 28 ( 3): 1976.
14.
Beebe Gilbert W. "Follow-up Studies of World War II and Korean War Prisoners". American Journal of Epidemiology, 101 ( 5): 1975.

-xxiv-

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