Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview

5
THE EDUCATIONAL COMPONENT
OF THE PROJECT

Mary C. Howell

The charge from the Kennedy Foundation for our Project was to teach health professionals about the problems and care of people who are both old and mentally retarded. We chose to define "health" broadly, to include well-being in every arena of life, to go beyond purely medical considerations.

We envisioned an Interdisciplinary Team composed of representatives from a variety of health-related professions. We sought to assemble, on a part-time basis, faculty who would serve as mentors to students studying in their various fields.

We intended to teach in many contexts. Graduate students in professional training were invited to join us for sixteen hours a week over an entire academic year, with a modest stipend. These students would function as full members of the Team, learning not only from the professional faculty member representing their own discipline, but also from faculty members representing all the other health-related disciplines.

Further, we anticipated opportunities to publish literature and to present at professional meetings. We planned to visit community residences, workplaces, day programs, and area offices of the state Department of Mental Retardation. Three one-day conferences were planned for each year, with presentations from our faculty (and students, as they became ready to present) for mixed audiences of professionals and paraprofessionals working with this group of clients.

Clients who are already in the care of publicly-supported service systems are growing old, and agencies charged with caring for people who are mentally retarded often claim that they know little about people who are old. Conversely, agencies providing care for old people maintain that they do not know about people who are mentally retarded.

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.