Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview

42
SPIRITUAL AND RELIGIOUS CONCERNS

Henry A. Marquardt

For many people with mental retardation, it is difficult to sort out feelings, emotions, and needs, and to give expression to them. Also, the means and opportunities to satisfy their concerns are not always easily available. It is important to understand these two factors in relation to the history of this population with regard to their religious education and faith development, and the status of the Church today with regard to its ministry to people with disabilities.

For those who were raised in the Catholic tradition, this age group was served by a Church whose primary ministry was a sacramental ministry to people with handicaps. They received Baptism, Penance, First Communion, and Confirmation. Matrimony and Priesthood were ruled out because of the presence of disability. People with mental retardation were given basic education for reception of the sacraments, but there really was no follow-up or ongoing challenge to grow in their faith commitment. Mental retardation automatically conferred sainthood. Their goal was achieved. The Church could breathe easy. Also, this group was sheltered from knowledge and awareness of bereavement process and from education about human sexuality--both means of continued personal growth. Religion stressed offering up one's handicap as a means of bearing the cross.

The focus of the Church has changed significantly in recent times. It now takes a holistic approach with its parishioners. The major concern is not just the soul, but the total person. Development of personhood is vital for salvation. Religion should assist a person in discovering her identity, and the goodness, talent, and beauty that God has given to her. Preaching "love your neighbor as yourself" takes on a whole new meaning. It is important to know that one is lovable and has an inner gift to share with others. Thus, liturgy, services, and religious education become experiences of personal growth. The Church calls

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.