Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview

The lasting message I derive from my internship on the Team is simply that what ought to be done can be done. In the delivery of health care every patient should be treated with respect, as a complete person--not simply a disconnected anatomical part. If the patient is to be respected as a person, then the definition of health care needs should start with patients, rather than with administrators and the allocation of high technology equipment, which may, in fact, have little positive impact on the general health and well-being of our nation. The Kennedy Aging Project presented a model for dealing with people in need of assistance, and I believe that this model can and should be utilized in addressing health care needs throughout the United States.


75
SPIRITUALITY IN THE SECULAR SERVICE ENVIRONMENT

Mark Hatch

As a seminary student who aspires to ordained ministry, I found the opportunity to participate in a predominantly secular endeavor such as the Kennedy Aging Project, as a year-long field education placement, both exciting and unnerving. Exciting, on the one hand, in that the Interdisciplinary Team offered a new and potentially transforming avenue for exploring issues of spirituality and ministry with a wide range of other professionals, students, clients, and caregivers. Unnerving, precisely because such opportunity is rare in the ministerial vocation and because expectation always conspires to outstrip reality in such situations. How would I, and the professional bias I represented, contribute to the successful workings of the Team? How would spirituality be raised and considered as one of the areas that we were to explore in our joint undertaking?

-418-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.