Serving the Underserved: Caring for People Who Are Both Old and Mentally Retarded: A Handbook for Caregivers

By Mary C. Howell; Deirdre G. Gavin et al. | Go to book overview
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Authors' Biographies

S. Charles Archuleta, B.S. I received my B.S. in Biology and Anthropology from the University of New Mexico. I am currently a third-year student at Boston University School of Law.

My introduction to the problems faced by people who are old and mentally retarded has come as a result of my student internship with the Kennedy Aging Project. My interest in the potential legal issues of hospice care providers results from my general interest in questions of medical ethics and their legal consequences. My work on the Hospice Care Committee of the Fernald State School gave me the opportunity to combine my concerns for people who are less fortunate, and my interest in the medical-legal field, via preparation of a review of the current case law and its meaning with respect to hospice caregivers.

Thomas V. Barbera, Jr. I was a student at Boston College School of Management from 1977 to 1980. In 1980 I left school to care for my dying brother. In 1982 I returned to Boston and began working at the Fernald State School, in a residence serving twenty people who were mentally retarded and old. I am presently a Habilitative Coordinator at Fernald. Along with other team members, I developed several senior citizen programs at Wallace Building.

I am currently enrolled in the University of Massachusetts Boston School of Public and Community Service. I have been affiliated with the Kennedy Aging Project for its entire three years. I have served on the Aging Committee and the Death and Dying Committee of the Fernald State School for the past four years. I am also a member of the Department of Mental Retardation Advisory Council on Elder Services.

My interest in aging and death and dying comes from my personal experience and current academic pursuits. I have worked as a grief counselor with several people who were old and mentally retarded who have died. I have developed, implemented, and evaluated several programs for clients who are mentally retarded and also old. I am an author of the Death and Dying Handbook and have conducted training sessions in death and dying and program development in a number of settings.

Bridget M. Bearss, M.Ed., RSCJ. I received my B.A. in Elementary-Special-Early Childhood Education from Maryville College, my

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