Treasure Island

By Robert Louis Stevenson; Frank Godwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXI
THE TREASURE-HUNT -- FLINT'S POINTER

" J IM," said Silver, when we were alone, "if I saved your life, you saved mine, and I'll not forget it. -- I seen the doctor waving you to run for it with the tail of my eye, I did -- and I seen you say no as plain as hearing. Jim, that's one to you. This is the first glint of hope I had since the attack failed, and I owe it to you. And now, Jim, we're to go in for this here treasure-hunting, with sealed orders, too, and I don't like it; and you and me must stick close, back to back like, and we'll save our necks in spite o' fate and fortune."

Just then a man hailed us from the fire that breakfast was ready, and we were soon seated here and there about the sand over biscuit and fried junk. They had lighted a fire fit to roast an ox; and it was now grown so hot that they could only approach it from the windward, and even there not without precaution. In the same wasteful spirit, they had cooked, I suppose, three times more than we could eat; and one of them, with an empty laugh, threw what was left into the fire, which blazed and roared again over this unusual fuel. I never in my life saw men so careless of the morrow; hand to mouth is the

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